Preparing for the 2012 Elections. Mogilev

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April 22, 2016 17:46

The state of the ideological work in labor collectives of the city and measures to improve it were discussed during a regular meeting of the Mogilev City Council.

The Deputy Cchairman of the Executive Committee Igor Shardyko, said that a strategically verified system of ideological work was organized in Mogilev. Among other things, the Vice-Mayor expressed hope, “we can work out the 2012 elections in a proper manner" (at the same time he made a reservation that opposition is planning surprises).

Head of the Ideological Department of the Eexecutive Committee Alla Galushko reported that there were over 500 ideological workers in the city. In their work they use various means: traditional (lectures and seminars) and new (internet forums, etc.). Currently, the city has over 400 information and propaganda groups. 

Comment

It is worth to mention that such preparations by the local authorities to the “minor” elections (i.e. Parliamentary elections in Belarus) well in advance could be explained by the reduced level of confidence of the administration in its authority. During the aforementioned meeting, the Chairman of the Mogilev City Council Stanislav Borodavko noted that “in many respects, our ideology is based on the material well-being of the citizens”, therefore he called for careful compliance with the wage growth plans. Note that the official makes this declaration when real salaries of employees of the leading regional enterprises are decreasing. Compared with salaries paid on the eve of the Presidential elections, current pay in Mogilev decreased by 300-400 thousand rubles. For instance, reduction of wages was reported by the following companies: Mogilev Heating Systems, Mogilevliftmash, Mogilev Plant Strommashina, etc.

 

 

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